Saba


SabaSaba is a speck of an island in the Caribbean Netherlands Antilles. The island is home to the highest point in the island chain, a dormant volcano with the hugely appropriate moniker Mount Scenery. Contrary to what you may wish expect, drugs are a no no on all of the islands of the Netherlands Antilles, including neighboring Bonaire, Curaçao and Saint Maarten. At a little over 1,500 residents, Saba boasts fewer people than most high school classes. Saba is an up and coming ecotourism destination, with stellar scuba diving, climbing and hiking opportunities throughout the island. If you’re jonesing for the beach, Saba is definitely not the place to go.

Language

Dutch is the official language of Saba, but everyone speaks English.

Money

The official currency of Saba is the Netherlands Antillean Guilder, but U.S. Dollars are accepted pretty much anywhere. To find out about the conversion rates, visit our currency converter.

Accommodations

As a tiny island, there aren’t many places to put accommodations on Saba. Rates start at around $100 per night for hotel rooms.

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Food and Drinks

There are several restaurants in each of the four villages located throughout the island. Specialties range from American, Chinese and Italian to Creole and Indonesian. Each restaurant has a bar, where you can party the night away on the tropical evenings.

Holidays/Events

The big event in Saba is the Summer “Carnival” held each summer. Expect elaborate costumes and headdresses, like those you’ll find on other Caribbean islands.

Getting There & Around

Winair makes the trip between St. Maarten and Saba.

Ferries are available several times a week from St. Maarten.

In another brilliant exaple of naming things appropriately, the one road on the island is called “The Road.” If you’re getting around on wheels, it will be on The Road.

Electronics

Electricity on Saba is 110 volts, just like the U.S. Visitors from Europe will need an adapter.

Things to Do

You can dive one of the healthiest marine sites in the world at the Saba National Marine Park. Shop around and get some Saba Lace, the souvenir to take home from the island. The lacemaking tradition was brought to Saba via a convent in Caracas in the 1800’s. Once the women of the island learned the needlecraft, they ran with it, creating some amazing works of art. Hiking is a popular activity on the island, with well marked trails taking you through the rain forest, tide pools, historic ruins and natural wonders. Rock climbing and birding are also well represented on the island. Mostly, you can just chill out on this island avoiding the crowds you’ll find elsewhere in the Caribbean.